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Header-Welcome to Akamai

TRANSPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction
Program Audience
Program Description
Postgraduate Certificate in Transpersonal and Consciousness Studies
Master of Science in Transpersonal Psychology
Doctor of Philosophy in Transpersonal Psychology
Primary Faculty
Course Descriptions
Transpersonal Resources



Welcome to
the Transpersonal Psychology Program!

For hundreds of years the world has treated consciousness as a sort of by-product of chemical, mechanical, or mathematical processes. These processes might be understood by merely looking at the physical functioning of the brain and nervous system. This thinking has reduced reality itself to a system of algorithms designed to control risk in an orderly world.

Today scientists, psychologists, managers, and other leaders in the system are discovering that the world exists with both order and disorder side by side. We are finding that our very observation affects the outcomes of our own examinations. These effects have caused us to stop and examine what consciousness actually is and how it functions. Philosophy has attempted on several occasions to answer these questions based on theoretical logic. The difference between a philosophical model and the model that we here at Akamai provide is simply this: we are concerned with how consciousness, transpersonal consciousness, and transpersonal psychology interact and integrate with everyday experience. In this way we hope to build programs that not only allow the scientific exploration, but how that exploration actually affects you life, the human condition, and the world at large.

Recognition of these studies is based on the idea that we, as human beings, are having a human experience, and that that experience influences our comprehension and interaction with other consciousnesses existing on this planet. We have too long attempted to place people in molds that simply can no longer contain them. We have at one time considered humans to be clocks that apparently wear down over time, machines that can be moved and replaced like cogs in a greater machine, or computers that sees our knowledge as a basic input, storage, and retrieval system. Each of the methodologies has given us both freedom and limitations. They have given us freedom to interact in the world by modeling the world itself and placing that model over the brain, the mind, and the nervous system of the individual. They have limited us by ignoring the designs, artists, and creators that do not fit the model of the time.

We have been moving toward a new system of understanding. Our realization that information contains energy and energy contains information has expanded our awareness beyond that of mere input, throughput, and output. We have something between these three areas that causes us to think, react, and experience the world individually. Today we can no long be content with having experience defined for us by externalities that fit some mold or a conceptual format the world is going through at any particular moment. We need to build a new scientific model for the nature of consciousness. Our investigations should include a multidimensional approach to experience and its associated behaviors, perceptions, mnemonics, and the accompanying states of awareness that exist within each combination.

This program will explore the states and processes of individuals, groups, governments, organizations, and other movements. We emphasize the experience of both internal and external realities these various areas. We examine this experience using an organized scientifically based model. Akamai will, of course, integrate the historical, present, and possible future theories of consciousness with those of transpersonal states of awareness. We need to build a background for a new way of connecting to our inner lives and our outer world. We are being forced to update our systems just about every eighteen months. This is a left over from the computer model, where systems double every eighteen months. And yet humanity seems to be falling behind schedule. Our science can now do things beyond our ability to manage. These include areas as diverse as cloning, leaving the planet, destroying life on a massive scale, instantaneous communication, and tracking just about every aspect of an individual's life. Soon we will be using nanotechnology along side of genetically produced food. We will be using three dimensional representations of computer realities with a full surround sound and visual environments. And still we have not been able to deal with the addictions of our past.

Our addictions stem from our willingness to escape reality, for whatever reason. We have moved from physical addictions: drugs, alcohol, smoking, and sex, to mental addictions: gambling, addictive shopping, and credit cards. It can easily be imagined that soon we will enter into computer created realities and the accompanying addictions therein, this fact is being noticed today, where individuals are being labeled cyber-addicts.

Meanwhile, much of the world still lives in poverty, surrounded by hatred, and war, and disease, and death. Our present systems of understanding human nature have led us to a threshold we are fast approaching. This threshold contains a new awareness of human consciousness and all of its related fields. It is our hope that the students in this program take their learning back into their daily lives, their jobs, their relationships, and even their play. It is hoped that by understanding the consciousness of self and organization the graduate will have the tools for change and change management; whether that be through understanding static states, transpersonal states, or the scientific approach of transpersonal psychology. We can move away from the restrictions of risk management and toward a new frontier of discovery, where everything is open to investigation. Everything is once again on the table as it relates to everyday experience.

Regards,

Steven J. Cox
Program Director

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Program Objectives
Program Concentrations

Program Objectives
The Transpersonal Psychology Program focuses on the following objectives:

Deepening knowledge of the transpersonal realm.
Deepening and widening knowledge of the Transpersonal realm, including the means for its access, self-control, and relationship to power. This deepening involves an integration/adaptation of past practices to the present and future possibilities, the development of techniques in accordance with the evolution of consciousness, and the building of a bridge between contemporary science and technology and traditional spiritual practices. It includes the study of dreams, visions and hallucinations, mythological symbolism, and the arts, how they contribute and relate to contemporary understanding of concrete reality and the subjective participation of the observer.

Mapping the history of religions.
Mapping the history of how great religions and shamanic traditions have interpreted and contained transpersonal experiences. Differences between how East and West, North and South functioning have molded our politics and economics is explored; lunar and solar, monotheistic and polytheistic approaches are compared.

Differentiating between illness and health.
While highly gifted and disciplined individuals, those with trans-rational potential, have achieved control over their transiting across levels of reality, others, functioning at a pre-rational level, find themselves swept away to levels of otherness that they have no control over, and/or no awareness of. While trans-rational individuals are often teachers and healers, sometimes prophets and visionary artists who help move culture to its next stage of development, the pre-rational individuals are dysfunctional and need help with adapting to ordinary reality. Correct differentiation between these two types ensures that the appropriate treatment is given in times of spiritual emergence.

Healing the split between realities, within and without.
The split within addresses individuals or groups that fail to entertain smooth communications between realities caused by illness such as schizophrenia or various forms of cults that overemphasize one reality at the expense of balance. The split without addresses the problem of hatred, disrespect, indifference for and neglect of other individuals, groups or the environment. In this program, special emphasis is placed on healing the split between social group/nations that differ in belief systems and developmental level, seeking to find the deeper level of communication that holds the power to heal hatred and separation, and the split between Culture and Nature.

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Program Concentrations
The Transpersonal Psychology Program offers the following major concentrations for pursuit of study:

Creativity and Consciousness
Integral Health
Consciousness and Transformative Experience
Wisdom Traditions: Cross-Cultural Perspectives
Transpersonal Perspectives in Psychotherapy

Creativity and Consciousness
Understanding the creative act as a spiritual practice is not new in the history of art. In Traditional cultures the act of creating has been associated with ritual, bringing into form that which is formless, making order out of chaos, echoing the original cosmos, the original creation. Creativity was understood as a scared journey into the unknown, an encounter with the greater spiritual ground,. Created works were seen as divine inspirations, messages from the gods, spiritual gifts. The created objects themselves were thought to contain sacred power. They were capable of healing the viewers as well as their world. With these kinds of understanding, the artist is seen, not simply as an individual practitioner voicing a personal concern or bringing a vision of beauty into the world for purely esthetic enjoyment, but as a healer, a voice whose song is essential to the renewal and evolution of the world.

Integral Health
Integral Health encompasses conventional, holistic, complementary, alternative, public, ecological, energy, spiritual, mind-body, cultural, and integrative perspectives on health within a coherent, unifying and practical framework (as opposed to "integrative" and "holistic" models which lack cohering explanatory frameworks). Integral Health studies are underpinned by an interdisciplinary developmental meta-model that places importance on the healer's own integral development, epistemological breadth, and capacities to see interrelated movement of the greater whole grounded primarily in Wilber's evolutionary AQAL Integral philosophy and it's development through other leading Integral Theorists (e.g. McIntosh).

Consciousness and Transformative Practice
The field of consciousness studies has been informed by transformative practice and research in meditation, psychotropics, hypnosis, dreams, religious ritual, psychic and therapeutic practices. Research in the field has focused on the physical, mental, social, and spiritual aspects of these consciousness techniques. Transformative practice has served to expand the traditional views of mind, science, and the role of consciousness in world change.

Wisdom Traditions: Cross Cultural Perspectives
The world's wisdom traditions have long mapped the transpersonal territory and provided tools for healing and transformation. These maps can be found in the Kabbalah, shamanic, Hindu yogic, Buddhist, and creation-centered Christian traditions. Each tradition provides a unique contribution to understanding the cross-cultural roots of transpersonal experience.

Transpersonal Perspectives in Psychotherapy
As a Forth Force psychology the transpersonal tradition has lead to new perspectives in the understanding of self, psychopathology, spiritual experience and crisis, as well as innovative therapeutic techniques for healing towards psychological and cultural wholeness. Among these are Jungian Psychology, Near-Death therapy, psychedelic therapy, and mindfulness practices.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Master of Science in Transpersonal Psychology
Doctor of Philosophy in Transpersonal Psychology

MASTER OF SCIENCE

Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements

Entry Requirements
As prerequisites for acceptance to the Master of Science in in Transpersonal Psychology, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized Bachelor's degree in an appropriate field of study and have meaningful professional experience.

Applicants are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills. If you are a second language English applicant, you should submit records of TOEFL examination with scores of 500 minimums or provide original written work that demonstrates advanced level English-language skills. You are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet and other outside library resources for the full extent of your program.

Students in the Master of Science in Transpersonal Psychology will complete a minimum of 36 credits above the Bachelor's level including a thesis. The coursework requirements include the academic major, the academic minor, research preparation, the thesis project, and additional electives, as needed, to satisfy the minimum credit requirements.

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Degree Requirements
Students in the Master of Science in Transpersonal Psychology will complete a minimum of 40 credits above the baccalaureate level including comprehensive examinations and a thesis. The coursework requirements include the core academic subjects and major concentration, research preparation, the thesis project, and additional electives, as needed, to satisfy the minimum credit requirements. Master's students complete a comprehensive examination, written and oral, at the conclusion of the academic coursework; they prepare a formal thesis proposal, complete the thesis project, and prepare the manuscript for faculty review. Master's students also complete an oral review of thesis at the conclusion of the physical manuscript review.

Degree Requirements:

Core Academic Studies (Required: 18 credits)
Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits)
Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits)
EXM 880: Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
RES 890: Thesis Project (Required: 4 credits)
EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

CORE ACADEMIC STUDIES
Master's students must complete 18 graduate credits in core coursework comprising an academic major. These are the foundational competencies in theories, principles, and practices, and the historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the discipline. These courses represent the core competencies and essential elements, which define your field of study and establish the underlying foundations upon which you may base your advanced professional development.

Required: The following courses (18 credits):

TCS 500: Fundamentals of Transpersonal Studies (3 credits)
TCS 501: Wisdom Traditions: World Religions (3 credits)
TCS 502: Human Development: Transpersonal Perspectives (3 credits)
TCS 503: Paradigms of Consciousness (3 credits)
TCS 504:Conciousness and Healing (3 credits)
TCS 505: Creativity and Consciousness (3 credits)

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MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS
Master's students also complete coursework comprising a major concentration of at least 9 credits.

Definition of Concentrations

Creativity and Consciousness
Integral Health
Consciousness and Transformative Experience
Wisdom Traditions: Cross-Cultural Perspectives
Transpersonal Perspectives in Psychotherapy

Creativity and Consciousness (Required: 9 credits minimum)
TCS 513: Creativity Theory (3 credits)
TCS 514: Creativity as Spiritual Practice ( 3 credits)
TCS 515: Creative Practice Within the Spiritual Traditions (3 credits)
TCS 516: Spiritual History of Modern Art (3 credits)
TCS 517: Art as Meditation: Practicuum (3 credits)

Integral Health (Required: 9 credits minimum)
IHS 401: Complementary and Alternative Medicine I (3 credits)
IHS 502: The Integral Model and Philosophy of Self, Culture, and Nature (3 credits)
IHS 408: Positive Psychology and Integral Lifestyle (3 credits)
IHS 405: Energy Medicine I (3 credits)
IHS 408: Positive Psychology and Integral Lifestyle (3 credits)
CAM 510: The Embodied Mind (3 credits)
CAM 513: Somatics in Multicultural Perspective (3 credits)
IHS 514: Integral Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 551: Spiritual Health and Healing (3 credits)
CAM 599: Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice (3 credits)

Consciousness and Transformative Experience (Required: 9 credits minimum)
TCS 527: Parapsychology and Transpersonal Psychology - a synergetic understanding of human becoming (3 credits)
TCS 543: Altered States of Consciousness (3 credits)
TCS 544: Science and Consciousness ((3 credits)
TCS 545: Meditative States (3 credits)
TCS 546: Synchronicity (3 credits)
TCS 547: Parapsychology: Mediums and Skeptics (3 credits)
TCS 548: Psychology of Dreams & Dreaming (3 credits)
TCS 549: Personal Mythology & Dreamworking (3 credits)

Wisdom Traditions: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (Required: 9 credits minimum)
TCS 552: Spirituality and Awareness of Cult Dangers (3 credits)
TCS 553: Mythology: World Traditions’ Myth and Symbols (3 credits)
TCS 554: Integral Yoga (3 credits)
TCS 555: Sufism (3 credits)
TCS 556: Christian-Centered Tradition (3 credits)
TCS 557: Kaballah: Jewish Mysticism (3 credits)
TCS 558: Buddhist Psychology (3 credits)
TCS 559: Shamanism (3 credits)

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Transpersonal Perspectives in Psychotherapy (Required: 9 credits minimum)
TCS: 523: Transpersonal Psychotherapy (3 credits)
TCS: 524: Conscious Aging (3 credits)
TCS: 525: Death and Grief: Transpersonal Perspectives (3 credits)
TCS: 526: Mindfulness and Psychotherapy (3 credits)
TCS: 528: Psychopathology: Transpersonal Perspectives (3 credits)
TCS: 529: Spiritual Emergence (3 credits)

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RESEARCH PREPARATION
Master’s students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis or major project in lieu of thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques, especially subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student's proposed project. Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

Options for Study:

IHS 465: Research Methods in Social Science and Health Sciences (3 credits)
RES 504: Introductory Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 506: Advanced Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 508: Qualitative Research (3 credits)
TCS 652: Existential and Phenomenological Research Methods (3 credits)
TCS 653: Transpersonal Research Methods (3 credits)
TCS 654: The Experiential Method: Hermeneutic Phenomenology (3 credits)

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COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
Once the student has completed the coursework elements of the degree, they schedule the Comprehensive Examination. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the minor field of study conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Required: EXM 880 Comprehensive Examination (2 credits)

THESIS PROPOSAL
Master's students are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to the concept for research under the direction of the primary mentor and following the guidelines provided by the University.

Required: RES 885 Thesis Proposal (2 credits)

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THESIS PROJECT
Following approval of the thesis proposal, the student will begin the research project. The thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is approved, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be the original work of the student and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement of the professional field.

The thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of the thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If the thesis takes the form of a major scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Required: RES 890 Thesis Project (4 credits)

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REVIEW OF THESIS
Once the students have prepared the thesis manuscript, they will be asked to schedule the formal review process. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to the underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and the presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The oral examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the thesis. The faculty reviewers explore issues related to the thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing the student through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the student will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for permanent archival storage.

Required: EXM 895 Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

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DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Entry Requirements
Areas of Concentration
Degree Requirements
Doctoral Committee Expectations

Entry Requirements
As prerequisites for acceptance to the Doctoral degree, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized Master's degree in an appropriate field of study and have meaningful professional experience. Applicants are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills. If you are a second language English applicant, you should submit records of TOEFL examination with scores of 500 minimums or provide original written work that demonstrates advanced level English-language skills. You are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet and other outside library resources for the full extent of your program.

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Areas of Concentration

Transpersonal Psychology
Consciousness Studies
Buddhist Studies

Transpersonal Psychology
Acceptable areas of doctoral research in Transpersonal Psychology will focus upon the psychology and spirituality of groups, across history and cultures. Such research answers questions, such as:

  • What is the difference between religions and mysticism, dogma and gnosis, spirituality and magic?
  • What is the history and evolution of these concepts?
  • What are the psychological, political and developmental correlates of these different forms
  • Where are we today, what are our main directions?

Consciousness Studies
Acceptable areas of doctoral research in Consciousness Studies will focus upon the physiology, biology and psychology of altered states of consciousness. Such research explores the following contents:

  • Physiology of the brain and altered states of consciousness.
  • Hypnoses, Active Imagination and Journeying, and other visionary experiences and their use in therapy or as recreational activities.
  • Biology of hallucinogens, their use in therapy, for spiritual transformation and in recreation settings
  • Problems of addiction and power. What are the addictions of our times? What are the potential powers of our times?

Buddhist Studies
Acceptable areas of doctoral research in Buddhist Studies will focus upon the theoretical, experimental, and experiential aspects of Buddhist psychology, Buddhist meditation practices; and Buddhist precepts. Such research explores such issues as:

  • An in depth study of Buddhist precepts and how these teachings can be applied to contemporary psychological issues.
  • A comparative study of Buddhist meditation practices and their applications.
  • A comparative study of the different schools of Buddhism: Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana and their contributions to the Buddhist tradition.
  • An in depth study of the Four Brahma Viharas: lovingkindness and compassion, generosity, equanimity, and sympathetic joy.

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Degree Requirements and Process


Phase 1: Dissertation Tutorial I - Basic Research Methods
Phase 2: Dissertation Tutorial II - Literature Review
Phase 3: Dissertation Tutorial III - Research Presentation
Phase 4: Doctoral Comprehensive Review
Phase 5: Dissertation Proposal Process
Phase 6: Conduct of Dissertation Project
Phase 7: Oral Review of Dissertation

Expectations for Doctoral Tutorials
The doctoral research tutorials are designed to help the student to expand the quality of their literature search, build the competencies for scholarly argument and establish high-level research and presentation skills. As an element of each tutorial, students are expected to pursue instructor-directed, as well as self-directed scholarly readings that extend understanding of the theories principles and practices in their defined field of study.

Students are expected to comprehend the critical features of sound quantitative or qualitative research including subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis in order to develop a sound dissertation or project proposal. Students will be expected to define an applied problem or theoretical issue to investigate, articulate a rationale for the study of the problem or issue, and formally propose and implement a quantitative or qualitative method of evaluation of the issue or problem. Students will demonstrate the ability to complete a thorough scholarly literature review on the topic they wish to present. Students are encouraged to select research methodologies that will assure valid and reliable evaluations of the effects of variables on individuals or groups being studied. The intent is to ensure that students have the competency to examine applied or theoretical issues in their fields of study and implement programs of intervention that are cogent, scholarly, and that make an original contribution to the body of information available in their field of study. Each student must clearly address issues related to research with human subjects and live animals. Students are directed to undertake theoretical and practical discussions with their instructors at Akamai and colleagues at outside institutions involved with the student’s field of study. Students submit written plans for instructor approval relative to ongoing discussions.

Students are expected to submit scholarly written work (approximately 10,000 words) in each tutorial as directed by the instructor. These papers must reflect high-level information gathering skills, quality written work, with effective academic argument with proper citations and referencing of the literature. The student submits the scholarly paper for instructor evaluation and detailed follow-up discussions. It is expected that work in the doctoral tutorials be directly related to and supportive of the proposed dissertation project that will follow the tutorials.

Students are also expected to demonstrate successful skills in the formal verbal presentation of their work (in increasingly more formal and detailed manner) before their professional colleagues. Presentations may be made at professional conferences, tutorials, workshops or retreats or at scholarly symposia organized by the student via formal written invitation. Students may also make arrangements to speak before college classes or meetings of professional associations, fraternal organizations, non-profit and community membership organizations. Under certain carefully monitored circumstances, students may arrange to make presentations in an innovative manner through videoconference, production and distribution of video- or audiotapes and other electronic, distance and online means. As an alternative, doctoral students may have the paper accepted for publication in the Akamai Journal for Human Advancement. Each research tutorial is summarized by asynchronous conference, permitting detailed oral review and follow-up of the tutorial activities.

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Phase 1: Basic Research Methods (Equivalent: 12 credits)
The first tutorial instructs the participant in foundational theories, principles, and practices specific to the proposed dissertation research, thus clarifying the underlying principles and justifications that support the proposed concept for research.

As a minimum element of this tutorial, participants must complete a suitable course selected from the appropriate research offerings. Participants must pass a quality review examination conducted by the graduate committee, and if deemed essential, complete additional research methodology coursework to satisfy preparation requirements.

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Phase 2: Literature Review< (Equivalent: 12 credits)
This second research tutorial is designed to guide the participant in conducting a thorough and effective search of the scholarly literature in relation to a project of research. Participants examine the quality of existing scholarly literature in their field of research and participate in a quality review under the guidance of the doctoral committee.

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Phase 3: Research Presentation (Equivalent: 12 credits)
The third tutorial is intended to guide the participant in understanding the requirements for effective written argument, referencing and citations of the scholarly literature, and presentation of the findings from research and participate in a quality review under the guidance of the doctoral committee.

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Phase 4: Doctoral Comprehensive Review (Equivalent: 2 credits)
Upon satisfactory completion of the doctoral research tutorials, the participant will be authorized to schedule the comprehensive review. The senior member of the doctoral committee will direct the written and oral components of the review. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requesting creative responses that reach for the higher levels of understanding. Answers should be drawn from the scholarly literature as well as applications within the professional business environment. Proper referencing of the scholarly literature is expected. The oral component of the review shall be completed by conference between the participant and committee members and is intended to encourage an open discussion of the written essay responses.

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Phase 5: Dissertation Proposal Process (Equivalent: 4 credits)
During this phase of the process, participants prepare a formal proposal related to their concept for research. The proposal is completed under the direction of the doctoral committee and prepared according to published University guidelines, which shall be provided to the participant.

Phase 6: Conduct of Dissertation Project (Equivalent: 8 credits)
Following approval of the dissertation proposal, participants will begin their research project. The dissertation may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the dissertation is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the field and represent a meaningful and original contribution to the betterment of the profession.

The dissertation project may be conducted by quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of the dissertation manuscript should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages and be structured according to a set of approved research and manuscript guidelines provide by the University. Dissertations that take the form of a scholarly project must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

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Phase 7: Oral Review of Dissertation (Equivalent: 2 credits)
Once the participant has prepared the dissertation manuscript, the senior member of the doctoral committee will schedule the formal review process and act to conduct both the formal physical review of the manuscript and oral review of the dissertation project.

Following receipt of the research manuscript, it usually takes the three member doctoral committee four to six weeks to complete the physical review and prepare questions and commentary for later discussion. The oral review is carried out by personal conference and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the underlying review of the literature, the dissertation methodology, and the mechanics of the project, presentation of the findings, and conclusions and recommendations.

One outcome of the dissertation review process is a set of final expectations directing the participant through the remaining tasks for completing the dissertation manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the participant will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later arrange for the bound dissertation to be shipped to the University headquarters in Hawaii for permanent archival storage. Upon the participant’s completion of the final tasks, and receipt of the needed records and documentation, the University will issue a letter of completion to the participant. It will then make preparation for issuance of the transcript of record and diploma certificate.

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DOCTORAL COMMITTEE EXPECTATIONS
Doctoral participants will progress through their programs under the advisement and mentorship of a three-member Doctoral Committee composed of qualified Akamai graduate faculty. The Committee is comprised of a primary, secondary and tertiary mentor, each with a assigned role in directing the doctoral process. Doctoral participants are expected to work in unity with the same doctoral committee members throughout the entire program. However, participants requiring a change in committee members must submit a formal petition to the University administration to request the change and such petitions must include a special fee. It must be understood that changing the composition of a doctoral committee may result in a readjustment of expectations, as the committee works to incorporate the ideas and advisement of the new committee member. This may also result in extending the completion date of the degree.

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PRIMARY FACULTY

Steven J. Cox, PhD.
Program Director

Stanley Krippner, Ph.D.

Christopher Johannes, Ph.D.

Claudine Jeanrenaud, Ph.D.

Joann S. Bakula, Ph.D.

Elliot Benjamin, Ph.D.

Michael Cohen, Ed.D.

Peter N. Jones, Ph.D.

Stefan J. Kasian, Ph.D,

Lezlie A. Kinyon, Ph.D.

Niko Kohls, Ph.D.

Marena Koukis, Ph.D.

Juanita J. Rinas, MA, LPC

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TRANSPERSONAL RESOURCES

International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies and Energy Medicine
ISSSEEM is an international non-profit interdisciplinary organization dedicated to exploring and applying subtle energies as they relate to the experience of consciousness, healing, and human potential. ISSSEEM is in a unique position, acting both as a bridge builder between communities and a leader in the field, offering a community with a widespread appreciation of the energetic component within many disciplines including quantum physics, therapeutic modalities, healing, psychology, consciousness, psi and the understanding of our multidimensional existence.
ISSSEEM website

Transpersonal Resources

Association for Humanistic Psychology
Center for Consciousness Studies
Institute of Noetic Sciences
ICSA (International Cultic Studies Association)
Integral Institute
Integral World
International Journal of Transpersonal Studies
Journal of Transpersonal Psychology
Journal of Consciousness Studies
Journal of Humanistic Psychology
PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research and Consciousness
Saybrook Graduate School
What is Enlightenment?

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Applied Psychology
Integrative Psychology
Business Administration
Engineering and Technology
Economic Development
Environmental Studies
Applied Ecopsychology
Educational Leadership
TESOL Literacy
Public Health Administration
Complementary and Alternative Medicine -CAM
Sustainability Studies
Peace, Diplomacy, and International Relations
Transpersonal Psychology
Professional Studies
University Center
Degree Programs
Honoris Causa Program
Community and Continuing Education

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Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

Akamai University
187 Kino`ole Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720 USA